The Future of Learning is the Web

26 04 2010

FutureWeb 2010 Conference, Raleigh, N.C., April 30, 3:30-5 p.m.

Chair: Cathy Davidson, professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University. Davidson is the co-founder of HASTAC – the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory. Her research interests include American Literature, technology, the American novel, printing, race and gender and digital media and learning. Click here to view a full list of her published works.

Panel description: What do sports, Iranian election protests, Black popular culture, world soccer championships, global executive education and a Twitter film festival have in common? All are ways that innovative faculty are transforming education now, rethinking the basic configurations of higher education. What does a classroom look like when students can be in many cities at once? What does a teacher look like when participation and contribution happen from anywhere in the globe? What does learning look like when it is participatory? And what are the downsides? What does “open” mean when the majority of scholarly resources are locked in journals, in private archives, beyond the reach of many? And what does higher education have to contribute to the future of the Web? On many levels, the future of learning is the future of the Web. The panel will aim to specifically isolate the key challenges and opportunities in the looming future for learning and the Web and it will work to identify some specific action steps that can be taken today to work for a better tomorrow.

Panelists:

  • Laurent Dubois

    Laurent Dubois, a historian of French colonialism and the Caribbean who also writes on the global politics of football. His discussion forum about the power of global soccer is http://blogs-dev.oit.duke.edu/wcwp/. His current research focuses on his book on the history of the banjo, under contract with Harvard University Press, for which he received a National Humanities Center Fellowship and a Guggenhiem Fellowship this year.

  • Mark Anthony Neal

    Mark Anthony Neal, accomplished author of four books and one of the foremost scholars of Black popular culture in America. He is a professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African American Studies at Duke University. A frequent commentator for National Public Radio, Neal contributes to several on-line media outlets, including SeeingBlack.com, The Root.com and theGrio.com. He also writes the New Black Man website and is a national commentator on all forms of media.

  • Negar Mottahedeh

    Negar Mottahedeh, highly respected academic author. She received national notice for staging the first-ever Twitter Film Festival as well as for serving as a communications node in the Iranian election protests. She is an associate professor of literature at Duke University. Her blog is the Negarponti Files, and you can follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/negaratduke.

  • Tony O'Driscoll

    Tony O’Driscoll, author of “Learning in 3D: Adding a New Dimension to Enterprise Learning and Collaboration,” with Karl M. Kapp. He also also written articles in leading journals. O’Driscoll is a Professor of the Practice at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, where he teaches, researches and consults in the areas of strategy, innovation and technology management. He has previously held leadership positions at IBM and Nortel Networks.

For more information about FutureWeb 2010 panel discussions, featured panelists and more, click here to navigate to the FutureWeb site. To register for the conference, visit the FutureWeb registration page.





Intellectual property law depends on technological changes of Internet, FutureWeb panel leader Dave Levine says

26 04 2010

This week at FutureWeb2010, Dave Levine of Elon University School of Law and creator of “Hearsay Culture,” a technology and intellectual property law interview radio show/podcast at Stanford Law School, will lead the panel on the future of intellectual property and the Web.

Panelists will include Ann Bartow of the University of South Carolina School of Law, Eric Fink of Elon Law, Jacqui Lipton of Case Western Reserve University and Ira Nathenson of St. Thomas University School of Law.

“It will be a range (of topics) from concerns about copyrights and trademarks to speech privacy,” Levine said. “We’ll be talking about international issues…it’ll be a broad coverage.”

Levine said one of the biggest concerns with Internet property law today is the question of how to adapt current law to meet the changes the Internet and technology bring.

“Within the world of Internet law generally, there’s a running debate about whether we need Internet specific laws or whether currently written law is good enough to cover the field,” Levine said. “The Internet, of course, has a variety of impacts from distribution, to creativity, to innovation and abilities for companies to bring products to market more quickly, to communicate with customers and competitors and licensing partners.”

Levine said it must be decided if Internet-specific laws need to be implemented or whether current law is adequate enough to deal with the changing technological landscape.

He also said it is laws such as Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) that will affect issues such as piracy. ACTA looks to establish international standards on intellectual-property-rights enforcement within participating countries and is currently being negotiated in Congress.

“….Intellectual property law… is increasingly impacted and impacts the Internet itself; it’s an interesting interaction,” he said. “Where IP law is capable of dealing with the questions that the Internet raises, depends largely on how much change technology has lost to traditional social relationships and legal relationships.”

Levine said this topic will mainly be what the panel will be discussing. “Areas where they see the Internet and IP law conflicting and as the call of the conference suggests,” he said. “Looking towards the future for what the law should do, what issues will arise and how they should be addressed.”

To learn more about the future of intellectual property and the Web, register for the FutureWeb conference. More details about the conference schedule and speakers can be found on the FutureWeb site.

-By Laura Smith





The Future: Harnessing the Power of Open Source

26 04 2010

FutureWeb 2010 Conference, Raleigh, N.C., April 30, 1:30-3 p.m.

Chair: Tom Rabon, executive vice president for corporate affairs for Red Hat. He has over 25 years of experience working in government and the private sector, including working with international governments to create opportunities in emerging markets such as China and South America. Rabon previously served as the vice president of Global Government Affairs at Lucent and the state vice president of Law and Government affairs at AT&T.

Panel description: Many of the greatest innovations of the 21st century have been made possible by the movement toward broad-based participation and collaboration. Wikipedia, the Human Genome Project and Facebook are just a few examples of harnessing participation and transparency of process to deliver a successful outcome. As a vehicle for economic and social change, the power of open source is immeasurable in changing how people learn, how developers create and how companies do business. This panel will explore the future of open source and how society can unlock the value of information by sharing it. The panel will aim to specifically isolate the key challenges and opportunities in the looming future for open source and the Web and it will work to identify some specific action steps that can be taken today to work for a better tomorrow.

Panelists:

  • Michael Tiemann

    Michael Tiemann, vice president of open source affairs for Red Hat. His pioneering open source work led to the creation of leading open source technologies and the first open source business mode. He is the co-founder of Cygnus Solutions, the first company to provide commercial support for open source software. Tiemann is the author of the GNU C++ compiler, the first native-code C++ compiler and debugger.

  • Chris DiBona

    Chris DiBona, open source and public programs manager for Google. DiBona and his team oversee projects like the Summer of Code, which works to oversee license compliance and supports the open source developer community. He also works with Google Moderator, the polling locations API. DiBona has an international reputation for promoting open source software and related methodologies. His personal blog can be found at http://dibona.com/.

  • Brian Bouterse

    Brian Bouterse, research associate at the Secure Open Systems Initiative with NC State University and networking and systems specialist at The Friday Institute. He has previously worked as an undergraduate teaching assistant at NC State University. Bouterse specializes in cloud services, networking and distributed computing. View his LinkedIn public profile at http://www.linkedin.com/pub/brian-bouterse/6/917/a11.

For more information about FutureWeb 2010 panel discussions, featured panelists and more, click here to navigate to the FutureWeb site. To register for the conference, visit the FutureWeb registration page.